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08 Nov 2019 13:38 #522

Tiff

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You could cut out the middle man and just go to Optical Express 😳


www.opticalexpress.co.uk/magazine/articl...look-after-your-eyes
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18 Oct 2019 13:39 #521

admin

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Some good news that greeted me when I woke up this morning :kiss:



On 18 Oct 2019, at 00:25, brent jesperson wrote:

Hi Sasha
Long battle but victorious....
Brent'


Huge congratulations to Brent, this is closer to the amount of compensation that ALL damaged patients deserve for the irreparable damage to their eyes and lives!

'This week, a Toronto judge ordered Dr. Yair Karas to pay him $5.6 million* in compensation for what she deemed a poorly done and misleadingly explained operation.'

*Approx £3.3 million

'The case points to the potential fallout of an elective surgery that was performed on thousands of nearsighted Canadians for years, before being replaced by safer, more effective laser procedures.'

The report of course unfortunately downplaying the risks of laser eye surgery!
nationalpost.com/health/dentist-awarded-...im-worse-than-before
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10 Oct 2019 13:47 #520

admin

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It was my pleasure and privilege to meet with Dr Pedram Hamrah last week, at Tufts Medical Center in Boston Massachusetts :kiss:



For those of you unfamiliar with his work, 'Dr. Pedram Hamrah researches and helps patients with neuropathic corneal pain from natural or surgical causes.'
www.neec.com/…/our-on-going-research-in-neuropathi…/

I was at the clinic for more than four hours, undergoing countless different eye tests (plus a few extra to provide data for his corneal neuropathy research programme).

On this occasion I’m breaking from tradition, and will not be publishing details of Dr Hamrah’s answers to my questions about risky and unregulated refractive eye surgery, as I agreed our conversation was off the record!

Suffice to say, Dr Hamrah is not only committed to his research (importantly not a refractive surgeon so without related financial interests), but he actively helps many patients suffering pain after unregulated refractive eye surgery.

I can however mention that I took the opportunity to discuss Greg Brady, who is suffering a number of very serious problems, that no specialist in the UK has yet managed to diagnose, or provide any significant pain relief.

Greg suffers with persistent debilitating pain, and off the scale photophobia, following PRK surgery in December 2016 at AccuVision - The Eye Clinic in Fulham.

Going by what I'd told him, Dr Hamrah agreed that Greg most likely has extreme corneal neuralgia.

On the positive side, he said that he had successfully treated a few people as badly damaged as this, and he also gave me the name of a specialist in the UK who might be able to help.

I was pleased to be able to relay this welcome news to Greg, and his partner Catherine Froud, both of whom are suffering with depression and undergoing counselling as a result of Greg’s devastating eye surgery.

Whilst waiting for my confocal microscopy scans, seated in a small area, I overheard two people talking about the Corneal Neuralgia Patients Facebook group. I introduced myself, and suddenly there were at least six people exchanging information about their problems resulting from laser eye surgery!

Like those I met, many people regularly travel to Boston from all over America to be treated by Dr Hamrah, from Canada too!

Unfortunately, there is no NHS equivalent in America, and the majority of patients have to fund any treatment themselves, or depend on medical insurance to cover their costs - but for a limited time, like Diana Wozniak (who committed suicide in May), left facing an unbearable future with her pain relief meds stopped when her insurers withdrew funding.

Here are a few links related to Dr Hamrah’s work, but if you google his name you’ll find plenty more.

'Neuropathic dry eye can be due to diverse ocular conditions (e.g., DED, infectious/herpetic keratitis, radiation keratopathy), as well as surgical interventions (e.g., cataract and refractive surgery). Systemic conditions, such as fibromyalgia and Sjögren’s disease, also cause neuropathic dry eye. Symptoms can be potentiated by comorbidities like anxiety and depression.' (Page 2)

'In this case, tear replacement/conservation therapies alone would have been futile, leading to perceived treatment failure. Instead, the identification of corneal nerve damage caused by the refractive procedures led to effective and long-standing symptomatic control with AST.’ (Page 3)
www.ophthalmologytimes.com/…/neuropathic-dry-eye-wh…

'Corneal nerve damage, particularly post-refractive surgery, can result in hyper-excitability and subsequent chronic neuropathy, manifesting as severe corneal pain.'
iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2266702
www.eyeworld.org/article-treating-unexplainable-pain
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02 Sep 2019 19:12 #519

admin

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Typical of Optical Express to sickeningly turn an environmental issue into a free advertising opportunity :kiss:

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09 Aug 2019 20:57 #518

admin

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An article I'm sure you'll be interested to read, and perhaps comment on - especially when you see the names of the authors :kiss:

I was amused by this para in the introduction: ' Prior to elective surgery, patients need to be adequately informed of the benefits and inherent risks of the proposed treatment, possible outcomes, as well as surgical and nonsurgical alternatives to the recommended procedure.1,2 As the number of procedures and their degree of technical complexity grow, delivering the correct information to the patient is becoming increasingly difficult. On one hand, patients should be informed in detail about their surgical procedure; on the other hand, overloading patients with too much technical/medical information may have unintended negative effects by confusing patients, reducing their ability to retain information, and impairing their ability to provide an informed decision.1–3'
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5135399/
30 Jul 2019 16:52 #517

Jason

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After reading various articles. It seems I've been quite lucky but I'll tell you my brush with Optical Express.

After seeing a typical ad, I arranged and went for a review / first consultation with Optical Express in Liverpool.

They ran various tests and asked about my eyes. I have had an issue, for over a year I guess, which I described to both representatives, which was a coloured semi circle appearing at the top of my vision in my left eye every now and again and floaters. They checked my eyes and said everything is fine. They gave me costs for lens replacement which I agree to and paid a deposit. I went for more tests in Manchester and then on the day of surgery, thankfully the surgeon said he was not happy to go ahead as it looked like I had a partial detached retina in my left eye.

I went to A&E that day and a day later, they had carried out laser surgery on my right eye to repair a hole in my retina and a cryo buckle on my left as if had partially detached.

I do feel lucky that the surgeon*(who was not employed by Optical Express - I assume sub-contracted to carry out surgery) decided not to proceed but struggle to get my head around the clear fact that Optical Express are sales driven and the "specialists" in Liverpool are either not competent enough to identify problems such as mine or simply ignore them in order to get a sales bonus (which a lady in customer service did confirm they normally get if surgery goes ahead).
On another day, the decision to proceed may have been made and I'm sure a full detachment will eventually have occurred, potentially causing blindness or near blindness in my left eye.

Lucky, lucky me.

By the way, I still haven't got my deposit back.... apparently it could be up to 6 weeks.
*Asheet Desai